(This is part of a series of articles on plants native to our area. But why natives? Because each patch of habitat becomes part of a collective effort to nurture and sustain the living landscape for birds and other animals.)

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Editor's note: With the mandated closure to the public of all restaurants and bars in the state, except for carry-out, drive-through and delivery services, we are compiling a listing of which restaurants are remaining open to provide those services and the details involved. Restaurants that …

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With so much information circling about coronavirus (COVID-19), it’s hard to know what to believe and what are myths that are simply untrue and have no evidence to support them. Bayhealth spoke with infectious disease specialist Dr. Farida Malik, MD, to clear up some of the false information…

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At the beginning of this pandemic, Beebe Healthcare joined the rest of the world in halting our work and preparing ourselves for the expected surge of critically ill COVID-19 patients. Many people had their elective procedures postponed for safety reasons and in order to conserve personal pr…

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The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a lot of understandable concern. As we all work together to control the spread of the virus within our community, Peninsula Regional Medical Center wants you to know that your health and safety remain their priority. It is committed to providing you the quali…

(This is part of a series of articles on plants native to our area. But why natives? Because each patch of habitat becomes part of a collective effort to nurture and sustain the living landscape for birds and other animals.)

(This is part of a series of articles on plants native to our area. But why natives? Because each patch of habitat becomes part of a collective effort to nurture and sustain the living landscape for birds and other animals.)

(This is part of a series of articles on plants native to our area. But why natives? Because each patch of habitat becomes part of a collective effort to nurture and sustain the living landscape for birds and other animals.)

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Dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic is changing the way people live their lives and is creating some negative stress. Yes, there are positive stressors, but as Bayhealth primary care physician Dr. Cindy W. Siu, MD, explains, negative stressors have become routine in the past month and can wre…

(This is part of a series of articles on plants native to our area. But why natives? Because each patch of habitat becomes part of a collective effort to nurture and sustain the living landscape for birds and other animals.) 

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Everyone should be remaining at home as much as possible to prevent the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). However, there are times you may need to leave your home. Some examples of necessary reasons to leave your home include:

We called and you answered — 24 days into my role as president and CEO of Beebe Healthcare, I still am absolutely blown away by this community’s support of its local, independent, not-for-profit healthcare system.

It’s just about finished blooming now, but you may have noticed a small/medium-sized tree blooming white in round flower clusters everywhere along our roadsides the past few weeks. These trees are descendants of the Bradford Pear, a cultivated variety of Pyrus calleryana, the Callery Pear, a…

As many families are doing their part to stay home and practice social distancing in order to curb the spread of coronavirus, they may find themselves looking for affordable, convenient and healthful recipes.

I have watched our pickleball courts sit empty during the coronavirus quarantine, and it caused me to reflect on the benefits of pickleball in our communities.

The coronavirus pandemic is changing the way we all live right now. These are challenging times and it can be very stressful. I think of all of you, and I hope you and yours are all well. I know you understand the importance of following the guidance we have received from the Centers for Dis…

(This is the second in a series of articles on plants native to our area. But why natives? Because each patch of habitat becomes part of a collective effort to nurture and sustain the living landscape for birds and other animals.)

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Every health organization, including the CDC and WHO, is recommending social distancing in the United States right now. It might be the best way to reduce community spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). Gov. John Carney has expanded the state-of-emergency, places that used to be gathering places…

Spring is upon us, and that means golf season is getting under way. Do you love the game? Many golfers will say they have a love-hate relationship with the game. Golf is a demanding sport. It requires a lot of time and effort, and the definition of true grit for some of us to master the skil…

(This is the first of a series of articles on plants native to our area. But why natives? Because each patch of habitat becomes part of a collective effort to nurture and sustain the living landscape for birds and other animals.)

This week, I would like to thank the hidden army that manufactures and distributes pickleball products.

Starting when we are children, we learn that food tastes good. We start to explore different tastes and textures, soon learning there are foods we prefer. However, as we get older, we become more and more busy. This busyness in our lives can mean a rushed 10-minute lunch at our desk or on th…

The day a person puts his left hand on the bible and raises his right hand to affirm, “I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of president of the United States…” he immediately becomes fair game for members of the opposition party, as well as the public press. The curr…

New York World reporter George Alfred “Gath” Townsend survived exposure to live combat on the Virginia Peninsula, and traveled unescorted 20 miles to the rear to send to his home office copies of Richmond newspapers he had acquired. While passing through the rural habitats of unfriendly civi…

The adventurous George Alfred Townsend, as discussed in previous columns, received a plum assignment in 1862 as a New York World reporter attached to Union forces in Virginia. His initial experiences did not include “seeing the elephant” — the quaint phrase Civil War soldiers applied to init…

When we last left George Alfred Townsend, the reporter for the New York World traveled by ship to Fort Monroe at Old Point Comfort, Va. From there, he moved on toward his next destination, White House Plantation, owned by William H.F. “Rooney” Lee, the son of Gen. Robert E. Lee, but now occu…

When we last left war correspondent George Alfred Townsend, the youthful Delawarean had arrived in Washington, D.C., to recover from an illness contracted while attached to the Union army operating in Northern Virginia. “Gath,” as he later signed his writings, continued on to New York and re…

This is the fourth in a series about our hero George Alfred Townsend, a New York World reporter attached to the Union Army of the Potomac in 1862. Delaware-born “Gath” — the pen name he adopted later in life — was about to gain his initial experience with an army on the march.

In 1844, when Cadet Ulysses “Sam” Grant visited the Missouri home of his West Point classmate Fred Dent, he met Fred’s sister Julia. Grant admitted that, for him, “it was love at first sight,” while Julia showed a definite interest in this shy, sensitive visitor who arrived at their home on …

Mary Anna Randolph Custis, daughter of landed gentry, and Robert E. Lee, son of a destitute family, at first glance appeared to be an odd match — not unlike the partnership of Mary Todd and Abraham Lincoln (see Coastal Point’s April 26, 2019, issue). Yet third-cousins Mary Custis and Robert …

Mary Anna Randolph Custis, daughter of landed gentry, and Robert E. Lee, son of a destitute family, at first glance appeared to be an odd match — not unlike the partnership of Mary Todd and Abraham Lincoln (see Coastal Point’s April 26, 2019, issue). Yet third-cousins Mary Custis and Robert …

Losing weight and keeping it off can be a life-long struggle for some. In certain cases, people are unable to lose the weight necessary to be healthy. If you are struggling, talk to your primary care provider about whether you might be a candidate for surgical weight-loss programs. Then, cal…

A new born child on Dec. 13, 1818, was destined to obtain an exceptional education in Lexington, KY, serve as a wife and mother in Springfield, Ill., and seek and find celebrity in Washington, D.C. Mary Todd Lincoln prepared well for her eventual role as First Lady of the United States durin…

The record of our nation’s bloody conflict in the mid-19th century is replete with studies about the accomplishments of Union and Confederate commanders and officials, as well as the soldiers and civilians who served their respective causes. The role of women during these troubled times, how…

After he surrendered the remnants of his once-powerful military force to Union General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Va., the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia had the difficult job of taking leave from those who had fought with him for four blood-stained years.

In recent times, a clamor arose for removing symbols of the Confederate States of America, such as flags and monuments, from public view. Arguably the most prominent figure of that 19th century separatist nation is a Virginia gentleman named Robert E. Lee.

William Joshua “W.J.” Croy was born on Sept. 17, 1843, in Dawson County, Ga., and enlisted in the 38th Georgia Regiment of the Confederate army in Atlanta, Ga., in May 1862. One month later, he found himself in Petersburg General Hospital in Virginia, suffering from rubella, or measles, cont…

When secession of several Southern states led to bombardment of Fort Sumter, S.C., and the beginning of war with the North in April 1861, Confederate President Jefferson Davis recognized the South's vulnerability as a predominantly agricultural region that lacked manufacturing facilities.

The further removed we become from the time of our mid-19th century national confrontation, the more valuable the artifacts from that period become. Values placed on these items on the open market continue to rise.

Jefferson Davis was born on June 3, 1808, in a community now known as Fairview; and, less than a year later, on Feb. 12, 1809, Abraham Lincoln arrived on the scene, 125 miles away in Hodgenville. Both were natives of Kentucky, and were destined to serve at the same time and in opposition to …

Those who have been to well-known Civil War sites, such as national military battlefields at Gettysburg, Pa., Antietam, Md., and Fredericksburg, Va., may be interested in learning about lesser-known Civil War-related locations right here in our state of Delaware.