Details for Sussex Shores 2019 Water Report

2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT (January 1 to December 31, 2019)
PO Box 170; Bethany Beach, DE 19930
Dear Customer,
Sussex Shores Water Co., Inc. (SSWC) is proud
of the fine drinking water it provides. This twentysecond annual Water Quality Report shows the
sources of our water, lists the results of our tests,
and contains a great deal of important information
about water and health. This publication conforms
to the federal regulation requiring water utilities to
provide this information annually. We support the
passage of this regulation and believe the
information provides a valuable service to our customers. The information in this report is also submitted formally to the Delaware Health and Social
Services, Division of Public Health, Office of
Drinking Water (ODW). This agency monitors our
compliance with the many regulatory standards
and tests our water regularly to assure high quality
water. SSWC will notify you immediately if there
is ever any reason for concern about our water.
We are happy to show you how we have surpassed water quality standards. If you have any
questions about this report or our water, please
call us at (302) 539-8044.
***IMPORTANT REMINDER—FIRE SAFETY***
In the unfortunate event of a fire, the firemen must
to be able to locate and operate the hydrants in a
timely manner. Minutes or even seconds lost
trying to locate a fire hydrant or clearing obstructions to the fire hydrant could result in additional
property damage, injuries or fatalities.
DELAWARE STATE FIRE REGULATION, Part
III, 3-2.3.1 states the following: An eight foot
clear path to all fire hydrants, and a four foot
clear radius around all fire hydrants must be
maintained at all times.
ANY OBSTRUCTIONS SUCH AS BUSHES,
FENCES, TRASH BINS, etc., must be relocated
in order to be in compliance with the
regulation, and avoid fines from the Delaware
State Fire Marshal’s Office – (302) 856-5600.
The Source of Your Water
Sussex Shores Water Co. is presently supplied by
ground water pumped from four 185’ deep wells,
which tap the Pocomoke aquifer, and five wells in
the Columbia formation. Our ground water wells
use the natural filtering capability of the aquifer to
remove harmful bacteria and other naturally
occurring substances from the water. Our water
treatment facilities use the best available technology to ensure the highest quality water. The
majority of our wells are located in confined
aquifers, which ensure high quality water
protected from surface-borne contaminants, past
farming influences, and saltwater intrusion.
SSWC works hard to provide you and your
family with high quality water and reliable
service 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

The Division of Public Health, in conjunction with
The Delaware Department of Natural Resources
and Environmental Control (DNREC) has
conducted source water assessments for all
community water systems in Delaware. DNREC
states there is a high susceptibility to nutrients,
pathogens, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides,
PCBs, organic and inorganic compounds, and
metals. Contact SSWC at (302) 539-8044
regarding how to get a copy of this assessment.
You may also review it on the website:
http://delawaresourcewater.org/assessments/
Bottled Water or Tap Water?
To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA
prescribes limits on the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.
FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants
in bottled water which must provide the same
protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may
reasonably be expected to contain at least small
amounts of some contaminants. The presence of
contaminants do not necessarily indicate that
water poses a health risk. More information about
contaminants and potential health effects can be
obtained by calling the Environmental Protection
Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline
(800-426-4791).
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and
bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams,
ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the land or through the
ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals
and radioactive material, and can pick up
substances resulting from the presence of
animals or from human activity. Contaminants that
may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and
bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment
plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and
metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result
from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic
wastewater discharges, oil and gas production,
mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come
from a variety of sources such as agriculture,
storm water runoff, and residential uses.
D) Organic chemical contaminants, including
synthetic and volatile organics, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum
production, and can also come from gas stations,
urban storm water runoff and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be
naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas
production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink,
EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the
amount of certain contaminants in water provided
by public water systems. FDA regulations

establish limits for contaminants in bottled water,
which must provide the same protection for public
health.
EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to
lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium are
available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline
(800-426-4791).
* Health Notes- Some people may be more
vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than
is the general population. Immune- compromised
persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone
organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other
immune system disorders, some elderly and
infants can be particularly at risk from infections.
These people should seek advice about drinking
water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC
guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the
risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other
microbiological contaminants are available from
the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).
* Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm
is a health risk for infants of less than six months
of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can
cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise
quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall
or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an
infant, you should ask for advice from your health
care provider.
* If present, elevated levels of lead can cause
serious health problems, especially for pregnant
woman and young children. Lead in drinking water
is primarily from materials and components
associated with service lines and home plumbing.
We cannot control the variety of material used in
plumbing components. When your water has been
sitting for several hours, you can minimize the
potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for
30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for
drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about
lead in your water, you may wish to have your
water tested. Information on lead in drinking water,
testing methods, and steps you can take to
minimize exposure is available from the Safe
Drinking
Water
Hotline
or
at
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
An Explanation of the Water-Quality Data Table
The table shows the results of our water-quality
analyses. Every substance that we detected in
the water, even in the most minute traces, is listed
here. The table contains the name of each
substance, the highest level allowed by regulation
(MCL), the ideal goals for public health, the
amount detected, the usual sources of such
contamination, footnotes explaining our findings,
and a key to units of measurement.
Definitions of MCL and MCLG are important.

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL:
The highest level of a contaminant that is
allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as
close to the MCLGs as feasible using the
best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or
MCLG: The level of a contaminant in
drinking water below which there is no
known or expected risk to health. MCLGs
allow for a margin of safety.
Detected Level: The highest level detected
of a contaminant for comparison against
the acceptance levels for each parameter.
These levels could be the highest single
measurement, or an average of values
depending on the contaminant.
Range: The lowest to the highest values
for all samples tested for each parameter.
If only one sample is tested, or no range is
required for this report, then no range is
listed for that contaminant in the table.
Treatment Technique (TT): A required
process intended to reduce the level of a
contaminant in drinking water.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a
contaminant which, if exceeded triggers
treatment or other requirements which a
water system must follow.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking
water disinfectant below, which there is no
known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs
do not reflect the benefits of the use of
disinfectants to control microbial contamination.
Your Drinking Water Surpasses All State
and
Federal Standards for Drinking Water
The data presented in this report
represents the most recent testing
performed by the Delaware Health and
Social Services, Division of Public Health,
Office of Drinking Water (ODW) and SSWC
in accordance with regulations. SSWC’s
water was also tested by ODW for scores
of other contaminants, none of which were

detected. This Water Quality Report was prepared by Bradley F. Dorey, Director of Operations, SSWC (Public
Water System ID #0000557). This report will not be mailed to customers; however, additional copies are
available upon request. Report may also be viewed on our website: www.sussexshoreswater.com.

Ke to T
Key
Ta
Tabl
Table

ppm=part per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l)

MCL = Maximum Contaminant Level
SMCL = Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level

MCLG = Maximum Contaminant Level Goal

ppb=parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (µg/l)
pCi/L = picocuries per liter
n/a=not applicable nd=non detected

*The State allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the
concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though
representative, may be more than one year old.

Un
Unr
Unregulated
Unregulate
Unregula
Unregul
Unregu
Unre
In
Inorganic
Inorgani
Inorgan
Inorga
Inor
Ino
R
Resul
Resu
Results
e
Alkalinity
Chloride
pH
Sodium
Sulfate
Regu
R
Regulated
Regulate
Regula
Regul
e
In
Inorganic
Inorgani
Inorgan
Inorga
Inor
Ino
Re
Results
Resul
Resu

Da
Date
Teste
T
Tested
e
1/19 &
5/19
1/19 &
5/19
12/17
1/19 &
5/19
1/19 &
5/19
Da
Date
Teste
T
Tested
e

U
Units
Uni
n
MCLG
MCL
ppm
ppm

250

ppm
ppm

50

ppm
Un
Units
Uni
MCLG
MCL

Copper

2019

ppm

0

Nitrate

2019

ppm

0

Vo
Volatil
Volati
Vola
Vol
Volatile
Or
Orga
Organ
Organi
Organic
O
Da
Date
Compounds
Compoun
Compou
Co
Compo
Com
Teste
T
Tested
e

Un
Units
Uni
MCLG
MCL

MCL
(S
(SMCL)
(SMCL

Dete
D
Detected
Detecte
e
Level
Lev

Range/
Ra
Range
Ran
Average
Avera
Av
Aver
Ave
L
Leve
Level
Le
Lev

n/a

37.6

36.8-39.7/38.3

M
Majo
Maj
Major
a
S
So
Sou
Sour
Source
Sources

(250)

84.2

50.6-84.2/67.4
5036-84.2/67.4

(6.5-8.5)

7.1

6.8-7.1/6.95

n/a

51.6

38.6-51.5/45.1

Runoff; leaching from nautral deposits

(250)

9.9

7.7-9.9/8.8

Erosion of natural deposits

MCL

Dete
D
Detected
Detecte
e
Lev
Level

Ra
Range
Ran

Major
Ma
Majo
Maj
S
Sou
Sour
Source
Sources
So

n/a

Corrosion of household plumbing;
erosion of natural deposits

90th
AL=1.3 Percentile
.012

Runoff; leaching from nautral deposits

10

4

3.4-3.56

Erosion of natural deposits; fertilizer
runoff; leaching septic/sewer

MCL

Dete
D
Detected
Detecte
e
Level
Lev

Ra
Range
Ran

Major
Ma
Majo
Maj
S
Sou
Sour
Source
Sources
So

Total
Trihalomethanes

2015

ppb

0

100

4.21

4.03-4.21

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Total
Haloacetic Acids

2019

ppb

0

60

11.08

11.08

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Water additive used used to control
microbes
Discharge from petroleum and chemical
Xylenes
2019
ppm
10
10
0.0006
.0006
factories
***One
**
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i 7
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gallon
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of w
wate
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wa
O
On
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cor
corr
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correson
corresonds to o
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7,350,00
7,350,000
gallon
gallo
gall
gal
gallons
ga
o
of water*
w
wate
water
water**
water***
wa
Chlorine

2018

ppm

4

4

1

1-1

Sussex Shores Water Co. is proud to be a member of the following organizations, dedicated to Safe
Drinking Water:
American
Water Works Association, Delaware Rural Water Association, National
Consumer
Confidence
Rule
Association of Water Companies, and the National Rural Water Association.
The Consumer Confidence Rule requires community water systems to prepare andCP
provide
to their
20200703
1T
customers annual consumer confidence reports on the quality of the water delivered by the systems.

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