Willy’s Christmas Trees supporting local families

Date Published: 
December 13, 2013

The commercialization of the Christmas holiday can distract from the deeper meaning behind the season — giving. But one way community members have been demonstrating the true meaning of Christmas has been through the yearly “Willy’s Christmas Tree” sale at Good Earth Market, located on Route 26 in Clarksville.

Coastal Point • Submitted: Two children haul their wreaths from Willy’s Christmas Tree sale at Good Earth Market in Clarksville. Each year, sales went towards Willy Cannon and his family, but this year the event is being run by Beta Sigma Phi and will also benefit other local families.Coastal Point • Submitted: Two children haul their wreaths from Willy’s Christmas Tree sale at Good Earth Market in Clarksville. Each year, sales went towards Willy Cannon and his family, but this year the event is being run by Beta Sigma Phi and will also benefit other local families.“For people that have always wanted to give to other families, this is their chance,” explained Pat Hendrickson, who has helped run the event since its inception.

This year’s event is being run by the Delaware chapter of Beta Sigma Phi International. Originally, the tree sales went to benefit Willy Cannon and his family, but this year, the proceeds will also be distributed to other families in the area. Local elementary schools will be identifying the families in need.

Tree prices will range from $40 to $60, with all proceeds going to designated families in the area, but those who want to donate additional funds are welcome to do so. As always, Good Earth Market will also match 20 percent of the value of gift cards purchased for the Cannon family, which go toward Willy Cannon’s all-organic diet.

Not only do patrons get to help assist a worthy cause by purchasing their tree from the sale, but they also get a high-quality tree, Hendrickson said.

“I haven’t seen one tree that hasn’t been a beautiful tree,” claimed Hendrickson. “They are well worth the donation.”

So far, the sale has been very successful, but there a few more batches of trees that need to be sold in order to reach the goal of 150.

According to Hendrickson, community members, including the Ralph and Chamberlain families, have been crucial in taking the time and gas money to drive to Odessa to pick up trees. Debbie Evans of Miller’s Creek Antiques even donated her box truck and gas money for the three-hour round trip. Glen and Cindy Davis, who own a consignment shop in Ocean View, even constructed the signage for the entrance and put up wreath snowmen to catch the eyes of passersby.

“They’re good local families,” said Hendrickson of the community’s generosity.

Aside from getting into the spirit of giving, the event is designed to be a good way for the community to get together and enjoy each other’s company. A fire pit and music keep volunteers and patrons warm, and according to Hendrickson, customers will most likely run into someone they know if they stop by.

“You can stop and probably know somebody who’s there,” she said of the inviting atmosphere. “It’s just another place where people can get together and hang out.”

The event is also a way for local families to introduce their children to giving back.

“Parents want to teach their kids about giving to the community. It’s a time where people can get together and give back. It’s very festive and very positive.”

The public can purchase a tree or donate at Good Earth Market from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Fridays, and from 10 a.m. until dark on Saturdays and Sundays, until the trees run out.