Local News

Officer-involved shooting shakes Ocean View

Coastal Point • Submitted by Ocean View Police Department: The vehicle being driven on Saturday, March 18, by Ocean View Police Officer First Class Nicholas Harrington was badly damaged during the incident. Harrington received treatment for injuries sustained during the crash.Coastal Point • Submitted by Ocean View Police Department: The vehicle being driven on Saturday, March 18, by Ocean View Police Officer First Class Nicholas Harrington was badly damaged during the incident. Harrington received treatment for injuries sustained during the crash.In what many would describe as a quiet beach community, an incident occurred last weekend that caused many to pause and consider, “even in my town.”

On Saturday, March 18, a little after 10 p.m., Ocean View Police Department Officer First Class Nicholas Harrington was assisting Worcester County (Md.) Sheriff’s Deputy Anthony Rhode in the pursuit of Troy Lee Short, 31, of Hurlock, Md.

Short had been spotted driving in an “erratic manner” by a deputy in Ocean City, Md., around 8 p.m. that evening. The deputy had attempted to stop the vehicle; however, Short fled.

“The Worcester County Sheriff’s Office initiated this whole thing in Maryland,” said Ocean View Police Chief Ken McLaughlin. “They went to conduct a traffic stop of a vehicle, and the vehicle fled. They chased him, lost him. He ditched a car, stole another car. He stole a couple cars throughout this couple-hour ordeal that unfolded in Maryland.”

IRSD considers cuts to teacher raises, club advisors, more

Budget cuts are coming to the Indian River School District. Even with an additional $7.5 million annual income in local property taxes, thanks to the recently passed current-expense referendum, IRSD staff expect to trim at least $5 million from next year’s budget. And that’s in addition to expected state budget cuts.

Hockers set to open doors to local supermarket’s future

Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: State Sen. Gerald Hocker, left, and son Gerry are preparing to open their new grocery store at the former location of Harris Teeter, near Salt Pond.Coastal Point • Tyler Valliant: State Sen. Gerald Hocker, left, and son Gerry are preparing to open their new grocery store at the former location of Harris Teeter, near Salt Pond.On Sunday, March 26, at 9 p.m., the doors will close for the last time at G&E Supermarket on Cedar Neck Road in Ocean View.

On Thursday, March 30, at 7 a.m. the doors will open for customers one mile to the south, at the new Hocker’s Supermarket in the Salt Pond Plaza.

“It’s bittersweet,” said Gerald “Gerry” Hocker Jr., whose father, Gerald Hocker Sr., took over the Cedar Neck Road store from his Uncle Jake in 1971.

Even though Jake Hocker had the store for 18 years — less time than the 46 years Gerald Hocker Sr. has been at the helm — some longtime customers still call the store “Jake’s.”

As Gerry and Gerald Hocker stood in the new store this week, contractors swarmed like bees, and the buzzing of drills punctuated the air. Four brand new self-checkout stands at the front of the store were swathed in plastic, to protect them from sawdust.

IR Live! presents a musical of the decades

Live music is a hallmark of Indian River High School productions, and the students are ready to impress once again.

This year’s musical revue is IR Live! presents “The Corner Club on Baker Street,” featuring an original script by music director Nathan Mohler and student T.J. Oxbrough.

Performances are Friday and Saturday, March 24 and 25, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $5 per person.

Comments being accepted on ADA/DelDOT compliance

The Delaware Department of Transportation is updating its 2014 ADA Transition Plan to ensure everyone has access to state roadways and infrastructure.

April 2 ‘Dancert’ to benefit local musician with cancer

Lovestock: a Cancer Benefit “Dancert” for John “Taco” Wroten, drummer of the local classic-rock band Hooverville, will be held Sunday, April 2, from 2 to 8 p.m. at American Legion Post 2 in Dover.

Wroten, 62, was recently diagnosed with Stage 4 tongue cancer and is currently receiving treatment, which is limiting his ability to perform with the band and at his full-time job.

Fundraiser set for Hudson family at Roxana lodge

Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: Kevin, Merrick and Kristie Hudson pose for one of their first family photos. Merrick was born at 25.5 weeks and has been recovering at Christiana Hospital’s Neonatal Care Unit since birth.Special to the Coastal Point • Submitted: Kevin, Merrick and Kristie Hudson pose for one of their first family photos. Merrick was born at 25.5 weeks and has been recovering at Christiana Hospital’s Neonatal Care Unit since birth.As she was leaving work on Dec. 27, Kristie Hudson’s water broke. Normally, that would be a happy occasion for any mother-to-be; however, Hudson was only 23 weeks pregnant.

“So, we went to Beebe and I hadn’t gone into labor, so they sent me up to Christiana,” said the Ocean View resident, noting that a full-term pregnancy lasts at least 37 weeks. “I was on bedrest for two and a half weeks, and then Merrick was born at 25.5 weeks, on Jan. 13.”

Hudson said she had had an uneventful pregnancy up until the point where she experienced premature rupture of her membranes.

“Basically, your water breaks early, which only happens to 2 percent of all women. They don’t really know why it happens. Sometimes it’s because of some kind of infection. They did every test they could think of, and they all came back negative. So, we’re never going to know why this happened.”

County purchases property to expand industrial park

Sussex County recently purchased King Farm, a 74-acre property off Park Avenue, east of Georgetown, for $2.2 million. The property will be added to the adjacent Sussex County Industrial Park, which currently houses 20 businesses that employ approximately 900 people.

Creative Mentoring touches the lives of students and adults in IRSD

Coastal Point • Maria Counts: Officer AnnMarie Dalton looks on as OVPD mentees open gifts from the department. Dalton is one of three Ocean View officers who mentor a total of five Lord Baltimore Elementary School students.Coastal Point • Maria Counts: Officer AnnMarie Dalton looks on as OVPD mentees open gifts from the department. Dalton is one of three Ocean View officers who mentor a total of five Lord Baltimore Elementary School students.Although many kids have help and support from family and friends growing up, sometimes extra support can be key. That’s where mentoring can play a big role in a child’s life.

The Indian River School District participates in the Creative Mentoring Program, in which 299 students are active participants.

Lord Baltimore Elementary School Counselor Theresa O’Shields said the program really benefits young people in a positive way.

“It is really good for them. It’s gotten them out of their shy spells. Kids who have a lot of energy, or kids who don’t have a good male or female role model,” she said. “The teachers here are good, and they’re so flexible. They know it’s important for the child’s growth. They are wonderful people here.”

Local organizations offer scholarship opportunities

Entries sought for Jim Cresson Memorial Fund Scholarship

Applications are currently being accepted for the Jim Cresson Memorial Fund scholarship, administered by the Greater Lewes Foundation.

‘You’re not the only one’

Youth grief-support services coming to Sussex County

Sussex County children who have suffered major a loss can now attend weekly grief counseling in Georgetown.

With so much public interest statewide, the nonprofit Supporting Kidds recently vowed to expand its Healing Pathways Program, and the Hockessin-based group this month is beginning bereavement counseling for children ages 5 to 18 across Delaware, now including Georgetown.

‘Oh, the places they’ll go’

Inclusion key to student success for special-needs education ‘Dream Team’ at IR

Coastal Point • Tripp Colonell: Xiomara Weaver, Jackie Johnson and the River Café crew are ready to start the day.Coastal Point • Tripp Colonell: Xiomara Weaver, Jackie Johnson and the River Café crew are ready to start the day.It’s 8 a.m. at Indian River High School. The bells have rung. The morning announcements have been made. And the River Café is officially open for business.

Today, on the menu: coffee, tea and complimentary homemade cupcakes with green icing, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day.

Senior Josh Timmons makes his way down the school’s history-lined hallways in his official green-and-gold River Café apron, pushing his cart, without paying much attention to the cart’s one stubborn wheel, wielding the day’s orders and approaching his first stop.

This is the final task for the River Café each Tuesday and Thursday morning — and Josh’s favorite. He greets each customer with their own personalized order, makes the sale, stamps frequent-customer cards and, of course, tops it all off with his signature Timmons’ touch — whether it be in the form of inside joke, friendly pat on the shoulder or well-timed smile.

Speaker tells the students: Share your blessings and have hope

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Inspirational speaker ‘Principal El’ joked around with Indian River High School students while encouraging them to be their best selves now.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Inspirational speaker ‘Principal El’ joked around with Indian River High School students while encouraging them to be their best selves now.There is something to live and aspire for, said the man from Philadelphia. You just have to be ready when that opportunity comes.

He calls himself “Principal El,” and his mission is to motivate, invigorate and inspire students and teachers across the country. The teacher, principal and motivational speaker Salome Thomas-El brought words of wisdom (and a few laughs) to Indian River High School and Selbyville Middle School on March 2.

“You get a blessing and use it to help others. ... It comes back to you,” he said. Doing good in one area might tip the scales toward another good opportunity, such as a job interview or scholarship.

Similarly, “The way you treat people, that will come back to you,” said Thomas-El. “You can say what you want, you can do what you want, but the way you make people feel is what they’ll remember about you.”

Freeman Stage at Bayside announces 2017 lineup

Celebrating its 10th season bringing arts to Sussex County, the Freeman Stage at Bayside is promising to continue doing just that, and in grand style, as it announced on March 15 its summer season lineup.

Compromise found on Bethany tent ban

Bethany Beach Town Council members this week found some room for compromise on the somewhat controversial idea of prohibiting tents on the town’s beaches.

Ocean View continues budget discussions

Employee salaries continue to be the focus of the discussions of the Town of Ocean View’s draft budget for the 2018 fiscal year.

At the town council’s monthly meeting on March 14, council members voiced their desire to ensure employees receive fair, competitive pay.

Millville swears in council members, plans some zoning

The Millville Town Council swore in returning Council Members Robert Gordon and Susan Brewer and newcomer Peter Michel on March 14.

Outgoing councilman Steve Small commended Michel, telling the others, “You will enjoy him. … He suffers fools patiently. I don’t. … He has a cool head at all times. He will be a wonderful member and friend to you.”

South Bethany council begins budget planning for 2018

South Bethany Treasurer Don Boteler on March 10 presented the draft budget for the 2018 fiscal year, which the town council will continue discussing over the next few months, ahead of the start of the new fiscal year on May 1.

In the draft, the Town’s operating budget is about $2.4 million, which doesn’t include their reserve and savings accounts.

What is... Delaware?

‘Jeopardy’-style trivia hitting Millsboro library

“You think you know, but you have no idea.”

While local history-hounds won’t have to phrase any answers in the form of a question, there’ll be plenty of them asked when Elkton, Md.-based storyteller Ed Okonowicz appears at the Millsboro Pubic Library for “So You Think You Know All about Delaware?” on Monday, March 20.

Free bilingual paralegal service benefits Selbyville

Because of the large number of non-English-speaking crime victims locally, Community Legal Aid Society Inc., will now provide free bilingual paralegal services once a week at Selbyville Town Hall.

“We’re pretty proud. It’s us and Seaford. We’re one of two towns doing that,” Selbyville Police Chief W. Scott Collins told the town council on March 12.

Smoke test coming to a Fenwick Island sewer near you

Officials concerned of stormwater leaks

Concerned that stormwater may be leaking into the Fenwick Island sewer system, officials are proposing to smoke out the problem.

Local author aims to thrill readers in ‘Third Haven’

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Selbyville author B.B. Shamp smiles with her new novel ‘Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit’ at a book signing at Energy Gym.After an explosion shakes the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, a woman escapes to the Eastern Shore with her young son. She spends the next 280 pages figuring out what’s happening and why an unnamed evil is following her.

Local author B.B. Shamp used bits of her own traumatic — but slightly less dramatic — experiences to inform her new book, “Third Haven: A Novel of Deceit.”

In 2008, Shamp fell off a ladder in her D.C. home. In the hospital with a broken back, she suffered a massive pulmonary embolism, then major organ failure. Doctors induced a coma, but Shamp still faced a near-death experience and saw the fabled white light.

That could be a lot to carry when a person wakes up and must re-learn how to walk and speak, hampered by PTSD and a traumatic brain injury.

Over four years, she used “Third Haven” as a map to help understand herself and bury breadcrumbs of trauma and intrigue for readers to follow that journey.

The novel’s initial explosion shakes the main character, Claire, from her everyday frustrations and tosses her into a rollicking plot that pushes her from Maryland’s Eastern Shore to coastal Delaware.

“The plot is engaging … and there are a lot of clues as to who the antagonist is,” Shamp said.

Flying over Delaware beaches — now and then

Coastal Point • Submitted: Joe Hudson flying his Navion Range Master.Coastal Point • Submitted: Joe Hudson flying his Navion Range Master.Joe Hudson began his flying career while still in high school, during the 1940s, as a student fish-spotter. Today he is known as “dean of Delaware crop-dusters.”

By the summer of 2016, Cape Henlopen High School students had been flying camera drones and taking pictures of the Delaware beaches, including the World War II towers, for almost two years.

Thanks to a very unique photography class and enthusiastic art teacher, Jason Fruchtman, the students have learned to master the camera drone and create stunning images.

More than 70 years ago, Lewes High School students were quite literally flying over the same beaches for a very different reason. It was not a class. They were at work, fish-spotting. Just how did these guys get to do this?

Bethany council to look at beach rules this week

Bethany Beach Town Council members will look at a series of proposed changes to the rules for the town’s beach this week, at their March council workshop, set for Tuesday, March 14, at 11 a.m. at town hall.

New stage on the way

Revamped Freeman stage unveils 10th-season lineup March 15

The daffodils are up, the robins have returned, the beach communities are stretching, yawning and coming back to life. Spring is right around the corner, and summer will be here before we know it. As winter ends and the sun begins to warm the sand and the fields again, there is a question crackling through offices and gyms and supermarkets...

Who’s coming to the Freeman Stage this year?

IRSD referendum passes with record turnout

Overwhelmed LB turned to paper ballots

Voters were waiting in line before the polls even opened March 2 at six schools in the Indian River School District. But despite the long lines and a last-minute switch to paper votes, and with a lot of public debate, 57 percent of the public voted to approve IRSD’s current-expense referendum.

Frankford shows off new town hall at former J.P. court

The Town of Frankford this week held its monthly town council meeting not in the Frankford Volunteer Fire Company’s meeting room, as it has for more than five years, but in the building next door that formerly housed a J.P. Court. However, it’s no longer a court building — it’s the new town hall.

County council discusses state budget, reassessment

Sussex County officials are looking ahead at the possibility of a statewide property reassessment and potential impacts at the county government level as state officials work to prepare a 2018-fiscal-year budget that they hope will address a $350 million state budget shortfall coming in to Gov. John Carney’s term.

Millsboro Chamber hosting annual bridal show this Sunday

The Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce has couples-to-be covered this weekend, as the Chamber will host the 22nd Annual Central Sussex Bridal Show this Sunday, March 12, from noon to 3 p.m. at Cripple Creek Golf & Country Club.

“Every year, we see more vendors, new vendors who have never been in,” said Amy Simmons, the Chamber’s executive director.

Local woman thanked for being a teacher who made impact

Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Steve Shaner, left, reunites with Dorothy Fisch, his former eighth-grade English teacher, whom he had not seen since 1968.Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: Steve Shaner, left, reunites with Dorothy Fisch, his former eighth-grade English teacher, whom he had not seen since 1968.The meeting place seemed appropriate.

After all, college professor Steve Shaner wanted to thank someone who had opened up his eyes to the power of words.

And so it was that Shaner, 62, walked into the Frankford Public Library on Tuesday, March 7, and got to thank his eighth-grade English teacher.

He had not seen Dorothy Fisch, who now lives in Ocean View, since he finished eighth grade back in 1968. After all that time, his search for Fisch was started by remarks by a colleague who encouraged students and staff at Harding University, in Searcy, Ark., where Shaner is employed as an assistant professor of mass communication, to reach out to someone who had made a difference in their lives, and to thank them.

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