Learning Points

Bomb threat called into Clayton Elementary, nothing found

A Frankford elementary school this week joined the long list of schools being harassed by bomb threats.

School district trades additional staff positions for cash

Having exceeded a certain number of students enrolled, the Indian River School District is eligible for State funding to hire additional staff, but district officials have instead chosen to use the money for other expenses.

Two seats on IRSD board up for election on May 10

Election will determine reps from Districts 2, 3

Candidates may now file to run in the 2016 school board elections. The Indian River School District has two positions up for election on Tuesday, May 10.

There is a four-year term in District 2 (north Millsboro and southern Georgetown).

There is a two-year term in District 3 (south Millsboro and northern Dagsboro). Terms begin on July 1.

IRSD: Kids are safe, despite bomb threats

Almost daily bomb threats are weighing heavily on parents, as schools across the Delmarva Peninsula are peppered with (thus far unfounded) bomb threats.

The Indian River School District is encouraging families to remain calm, despite receiving threats at four schools between Jan. 11 and Jan. 20.

Teen scholarship writing contest will reward stories about diversity

To push back against stereotyping, intolerance, racism and bullying, high school students across the region are being encouraged to write and illustrate books that highlight diversity and inclusion.

H.T. Ennis briefly shut down for pool pump problems

Strong smell raises concerns, but ‘resolved’

Due to a problem in the school’s swimming pool pump room, the Howard T. Ennis School was briefly evacuated on Tuesday, Dec. 22.

“Apparently, there was a strong burning smell coming out of that pump room, and they were concerned” about the potential for a fire,” said David Maull, Indian River School District spokesperson. “It’s all resolved now.”

Public can register for free adult literacy program

Adults who struggle with reading can get a boost at the Frankford Public Library.

To help Sussex County adults with low literacy skills, the library started a free reading program through Literacy Volunteers Serving Adults (LVSA).

IR staff may be prohibited from sharing rides, social media with students

In a perfect world, every student athlete has parents or friends cheering on the sidelines. In real life, some kids can’t even get a ride home from practice.

Painting and packing holiday warmth:

SDSA students send supplies to homeless shelter

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Southern Delaware School of the Arts students were at times a flurry of hands as they packed six suitcases of supplies for a homeless shelter.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Southern Delaware School of the Arts students were at times a flurry of hands as they packed six suitcases of supplies for a homeless shelter.Students at one Selbyville school got a glimpse of gratefulness this month when they sent donations to a Salisbury, Md., homeless shelter. Southern Delaware School of the Arts students painted and filled six suitcases with supplies for HALO, a faith-based ministry that serves those who are homeless or in need.

The Junior Honor Society eighth-graders learned to be more grateful as they packed suitcases on Dec. 14. They categorized each suitcase by items: toiletries, warm hats, blankets, gloves, socks, diapers, books and games.

“Some of these things are common needs, and I can’t imagine not having these things in my life,” said student Grace Morris. “So the fact that people need these things so much just really shows you how much you should be grateful for the things you have.”

Sussex County high-schoolers to award $10,000 in grants

Funds available to treat substance abuse, harassment and suicide prevention

Who should serve on a nonprofit board? Typically, high-ranking folks in business, arts, medicine or education are responsible for bestowing thousands of dollars in grant money.

Indian River health teacher: Ease up on the vaccines

Paris Mitchell and his own children have been vaccinated. But, given what he’s learned in the past few years, he said he would have second thoughts if given the opportunity to vaccinate now.

WWII in the spotlight at Lighthouse Christian

Coastal Point photos • Laura Walter: Students at Lighthouse Christian School prepare to sing ‘The Lord’s Army’ to veterans on Veterans’ Day. Below, veterans line up for handshakes and thanks from everyone in attendance.Coastal Point photos • Laura Walter: Students at Lighthouse Christian School prepare to sing ‘The Lord’s Army’ to veterans on Veterans’ Day. Below, veterans line up for handshakes and thanks from everyone in attendance.Lighthouse Christian School is on a mission to teach students to honor U.S. veterans, filling their Dagsboro chapel at their annual Veterans Day program on Nov. 13.

A special tribute to World War II included student-led skits, prayers, songs and recognition of military families.

Before a full house of veterans and families, children sang songs from the 1940s, explained memory boxes and witnessed a POW/MIA remembrance ceremony.

Lighthouse Christian has two main goals, said organizer Pat Viguie: first, to honor veterans, families, current service members and those who paid the ultimate price.

The second mission is to educate. Children ages 3 to 14 put hours of work into the performance before the event even begins.

“We love America and we love our veterans,” Viguie said.

Worcester County, Board of Education escalate battle over school

Called to the carpet three weeks ago by the Worcester County Commissioners and facing a Nov. 23 deadline from the state for construction plans to replace Showell Elementary School, Dr. Jerry Wilson, Worcester superintendent of schools, continued to stand his ground Tuesday.

These kids will ‘Bee’ great spellers

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: In a battle of words, nearly 30 students competed in the first Southern Sussex Rotary Third Grade Spelling Bee, here with State Rep. Ron Gray and organizer Brendan Crotty.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: In a battle of words, nearly 30 students competed in the first Southern Sussex Rotary Third Grade Spelling Bee, here with State Rep. Ron Gray and organizer Brendan Crotty.One letter at a time, local students made history at the first Southern Sussex Rotary Third Grade Spelling Bee on Nov. 10. In all, 30 students (two per classroom) were invited to represent their elementary schools: Phillip C. Showell, Lord Baltimore, John M. Clayton and Southern Delaware School of the Arts.

First place went to Rosnell Lewis of JMC (teacher Yanira Stoker). Second place was Katelyn Wingate, and third place was Gabriel Young (both from Olivia Lein’s classroom at LB).

For years, the Southern Sussex Rotary has provided a dictionary to every third-grader in the area. This year, these books prepped students for the first annual Southern Sussex Rotary Third Grade Spelling Bee.

The evening started with words like “birthday,” “young,” “across,” “leave” and “true.” Although it was single elimination for the first round, they were allowed to restart a word after an error, since they’re younger than the usual Spelling Bee age.

Students, staff feel the strain of increased population

An educator’s job is to support his or her students. But this month, Sussex Central High School’s student government lobbied for their staff, which is feeling the weight of a growing student population.

Student council president, senior Charlie Megginson described a recent meeting between State Rep. Ruth Briggs King and a cross-section of Sussex Central High School students.

Costumed kids ready for Halloween

Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: These boys are ready for Halloween and told the Coastal Point what they’ll be up to on Halloween this year. From left are:?Jaxon Rickards, Howard Toomey, Angelo Retzos and William Retzos.Coastal Point • Kerin Magill: These boys are ready for Halloween and told the Coastal Point what they’ll be up to on Halloween this year. From left are:?Jaxon Rickards, Howard Toomey, Angelo Retzos and William Retzos.Halloween is upon us, and no one is more excited that the children of southeastern Sussex County. The Coastal Point spoke with four youngsters at John M. Clayton Elementary School in Dagsboro this week to find out just who or what they are planning to be when they hit the streets in search of treats this weekend.

Second-grader Angelo Retzos is planning to dress up as a police officer. When asked why he wants to don the uniform of such a community superhero, he declared that “me and my friend always go trick-or-treating together and we always dress up as the same thing” — ever since they were little kids, in fact, added 7-year-old Retzos.

At the ripe old age of 10, fifth-grader Harold Toomey declared, “I don’t really trick-or-treat.”

“I’m just going to wear a mask and scare people,” he said, although he admitted that he and his scary mask might just find their way onto a front porch or two on Halloween night in search of candy. With all those years of Halloween fun behind him, Toomey said the year he was a zombie was probably his favorite.

Worcester Prep students earn Advanced Placement honors

Worcester Preparatory School (WPS) students in the Class of 2016 and alumni from the Class of 2015 captured 43 Advanced Placement honors from the College Board, the school announced this week.

State senator proposes mail-in voting for school elections

Mail-in voting could improve elections in Delaware, according to state Sen. Karen Peterson (D-Stanton), as public discussion begins over her bill proposing mail-in ballots for school-related elections. Introduced in July, SB 165 is titled “An act to amend the Delaware Code relating to public school elections.”

Literacy at the library: Volunteers sought to teach adult literacy

Most people take reading for granted. From email and medicine bottles to the occasional birthday card, Americans are constantly reading. But life isn’t so simple for people with low literacy levels, so the Frankford Public Library (FPL) is looking for people interested becoming tutors for adult literacy.

IRSD hits 10,000 students, examines state test numbers

The Indian River School District’s student population has unofficially hit the 10,000 mark.

The State of Delaware doesn’t take its official tally until Sept. 30, so there is still time for students to enroll or leave the district. But as of Sept. 21, the count was 10,208, which is 366 more than last year’s 9,842 students.

Mediacom offers $55,000 in scholarships to high-school seniors

Mediacom Communications is offering $55,000 in scholarship support for high-school seniors who plan to obtain further education. The scholarship program is in its 15th consecutive year and Mediacom’s investment will award $1,000 World Class Scholarships to 55 high-school seniors.

Rozell makes Dean’s List at Delaware Valley University

Steven Rozell, a resident of Frankford, was recently honored for academic achievement by being named to the Dean’s List at Delaware Valley University for the Spring 2015 semester.

IR schools carrying overdose-reversing meds

Board swears in new member

There are no documented reports of a drug overdose occurring in Indian River School District. And with a free donation of emergency response medicine, the district’s high schools aim to keep it that way.

The Delaware Department of Health & Social Services (DHSS) received a massive donation of 2,000 naloxone units from drug manufacturer Kaléo, based in Richmond, Va.

Being a good sport: SCHS earns sportsmanship award

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Sussex Central High School had a banner moment with its second DIAA Sportsmanship Award.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: Sussex Central High School had a banner moment with its second DIAA Sportsmanship Award.When a referee makes a questionable call, or the other team makes a snide remark, what does the athlete do? Just walk away? Or throw down their hockey stick and pounce?

When it comes to good sportsmanship, Sussex Central High School tries to walk the walk. That’s a step in the right direction, according to the Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association (DIAA), which just awarded SCHS with its second consecutive DIAA Sportsmanship Award.

The school received its new banner from DIAA Executive Director Kevin Charles at the Aug. 24 Indian River School District school board meeting.

From a four-page application, SCHS’s submission was a portfolio 3 inches thick.

“It’s a competition against … a rigorous set of standards,” Charles said, which asks about school policy, heated rivalry games, investigations, athletic handbooks, monthly sportsmanship meetings and more.

“This program … is intended to establish a school culture where sportsmanship is the culture … so when the chips are down …we automatically respond in the Sussex Central way,” Charles said.

Hudson takes the reins as school board president

Coastal Point • Laura Walter: James ‘Jim’ Hudson is the new Indian River School District Board of Education president.Coastal Point • Laura Walter: James ‘Jim’ Hudson is the new Indian River School District Board of Education president.After 10 years with the same leadership, the Indian River School Board recently elected a new member to serve as president, as Georgetown’s James “Jim” Hudson leads the board into a new school year.

Hudson inherited the board presidency from Charles Bireley, who stepped down from that role after holding it for 15 years, including the last 10, consecutively. (Bireley, a 38-year board member, continues to represent his district on the board, having also won re-election this year.)

This June, Hudson said, he was asked to consider leading the board. The board elects its leadership positions from its own members, and Hudson was unanimously elected. Rodney Layfield remains vice president.

“I think the major goal is to address in our population growth. I think that’s going to be a major thing,” Hudson said. “We’re really growing — especially in the Georgetown, Millsboro areas. We’ve really got to tackle that; hopefully, come up with some solutions.”

First time at IRHS? New student orientation scheduled for Aug. 27

Students attending Indian River High School for the first time are being invited to New Student Orientation on Thursday, Aug. 27. Parents and students meet in the auditorium at 6 p.m.

“For the next two hours, I have all the parents, and all the kids are with the assistant principals, staff members, and students,” said Principal Bennett Murray of plans for that night. “They do a scavenger hunt, learning all the different places of the school and some secrets to being successful in high school.”

The students will not only become familiar with the layout of the high school — they’ll get a chance to meet other incoming freshmen. Through team-building activities, they’ll get ready to see a few familiar faces on the first day of school.

IRSD announces new principals for 2015-2016


Several schools getting new leadership

Indian River School District is getting a little shake-up in the administrations of several schools. Here are the most recent changes:

• Char Hopkins is moving from principal of John M. Clayton Elementary to become the district’s director of Leadership Development.

• Heather Cramer is moving from assistant principal at Georgetown Elementary to become principal at John M. Clayton. (The Georgetown assistant principal position is open for applications.)

• Judi Brittingham is moving from assistant principal at Sussex Central High to principal at the G.W. Carver Academy.

• Karen Oliphant is moving from assistant principal at Sussex Central High to assistant principal at the G.W. Carver Academy.

Civil War Profiles: Shipbuilding in Delaware during the Civil War

When Quaker merchants migrated from Philadelphia to Delaware in the early 18th century, they attracted shipwrights and ship carpenters to the fledgling community that evolved into the city of Wilmington. In 1740, William Shipley, Joshua Way and David Ferris contracted to have the first vessel built in Delaware for the foreign trade at the foot of Market Street on the Christina River.

As Richard Urban points out in “The City That Launched a Thousand Ships,” over the period ending in 1775, shipyards in Delaware built more than 300 vessels for coastal and foreign trade. One story holds that the ship named the Nancy, built in Wilmington and at the time anchored in St. Croix, Virgin Islands, was the first to raise a quickly-sewn-together American flag when it learned the colonies declared their independence from the British in 1776.

In the 1850s, two firms — Harlan & Hollingsworth and Pusey & Jones — located along the Wilmington waterfront began to perform ship repair and engine installation work. Pusey & Jones also contracted to build its first iron steamship, the Flora McDonald. Harlan & Hollingsworth soon followed with construction of the steamers the Ashland and the Ocean. The shipyards fostered numerous supporting industries in the Wilmington area.

IRSD announces changes for new school year

The Indian River School District has made a series of adjustments to its daily school schedules for the 2015-2016 school year. IRSD officials said the minor modifications are the result of the school day being extended by four minutes to compensate for possible weather-related cancellations. The daily starting and ending times for each school have changed slightly from last year.

The district will continue to utilize a tiered transportation system under which schools will be divided into “First Start” and “Second Start” categories, with different starting and ending times for each group.

The school day for “First Start” schools will run from 7:40 a.m. until 2:45 p.m. Buses will arrive at the school between 7:20 and 7:30 a.m. and depart about 2:50 p.m. Schools in that group are Sussex Central High School, Indian River High School, Georgetown Middle School, Millsboro Middle School, Selbyville Middle School, Phillip C. Showell Elementary School, North Georgetown Elementary School and East Millsboro Elementary School.

The school day for “Second Start” schools will run from 8:30 a.m. until 3:35 p.m. Buses will arrive between 8:10 and 8:20 a.m. and depart about 3:41 p.m. Schools in that group are Georgetown Elementary School, Georgetown Kindergarten Center, Lord Baltimore Elementary School, Long Neck Elementary School and John M. Clayton Elementary School.

LB teacher Lambert is ‘a natural in the classroom’

Coastal Point • Laura Walter:  It’s all about the kids. Dana Lambert, center, was named Lord Baltimore Elementary School’s Teacher of the Year for 2015-2016. She smiles with local students, pictured, from left: Merrill Smith, Quinn Micciche, Kendall CathellCoastal Point • Laura Walter: It’s all about the kids. Dana Lambert, center, was named Lord Baltimore Elementary School’s Teacher of the Year for 2015-2016. She smiles with local students, pictured, from left: Merrill Smith, Quinn Micciche, Kendall Cathell
Dana Lambert is so dedicated to teaching that she was truly stumped by the question “What would you do if you weren’t a teacher?” But this fifth-grade teacher is happy where she is, having just been named Lord Baltimore Elementary School’s Teacher of the Year for 2015-2016.
With 22 years in education, Lambert has spent three years at this grade, where classes are departmentalized. That means students rotate to different teachers, like they do at the middle school level. Lambert teaches writing daily, plus science or social studies.
“When I began teaching in ’94, I feel like you’d stand in front of them all day. … Now, it’s different,” Lambert said. “My approach to teaching is: I have to give the students the background that they need, but I have to give them the opportunity to explore for themselves.”

Syndicate content