Arts & Entertainment

Country Festival to rock Millsboro this weekend

Coastal Point • File Photos : Left, Jimmy’s Grill participates in the bed races at last year’s event. Bottom right, Joshua Johnson competes in the ‘Redneck Challenge’ of throwing remote controls.Coastal Point • File Photos : Left, Jimmy’s Grill participates in the bed races at last year’s event. Bottom right, Joshua Johnson competes in the ‘Redneck Challenge’ of throwing remote controls.Good food, great music, fun games and more can all be found in Millsboro this weekend.

The Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce will hold the second annual Millsboro Country Festival on Saturday, Sept. 20, from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Held entirely at the Millsboro Little League Complex, attendees may enjoy a day filled with tasty food, crafts, a beer garden and more. All-day tickets for adults cost $5 and children ages 12 and under may attend for free.

Music lovers should bring their lawn chairs and set up for a day of great music. Starting at 11 a.m., Flatland Drive will perform, followed by Brady J at 12:30 p.m. Dirt Road Outlawz will take the stage at 4 p.m., followed by the Bo Dickerson Band. The Tennessee Mafia Jug Band will close out the evening, starting at 7:30 p.m.

Trick Trucks to host Truck & Jeep Show in Millsboro

Trick Trucks of Millsboro will host their first-ever Truck & Jeep show this Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at their Millsboro store location at 24572 Betts Pond Rd.

The event will be free to the public to attend or compete in, and will feature food, music, games, a raffle and giveaways throughout the day.

Canal contest winners create a community in South Bethany

Coastal Point • Laura Walter : South Bethany’s Sue Callaway was proud to honor winners of the annual canal-decorating contest. She stands (left to right) with runners-up, Pat Weisgerber and Carol Stevenson, Michael Lord of Lord’s Landscaping, and first-place winners, Phil and Cicily Iacangelo.Coastal Point • Laura Walter : South Bethany’s Sue Callaway was proud to honor winners of the annual canal-decorating contest. She stands (left to right) with runners-up, Pat Weisgerber and Carol Stevenson, Michael Lord of Lord’s Landscaping, and first-place winners, Phil and Cicily Iacangelo.Ever since Phil Iacangelo began gardening along the canal of his South Bethany home, he’s noticed a greater sense of community on York Road.

Watering the daisies, daylilies, coxcomb and crape myrtle early in the morning, Iacangelo is often greeted by joggers, cyclists and pedestrians.

His public garden not only starts conversations, but this year it won the Adopt-A-Canal 4th annual decorating contest.

Sponsored by the Community Enhancement Committee (CEC), the Adopt-A-Canal program lets residents take ownership and beautify their neighborhood.

“I think Phil adopted it about 40 years ago when we first moved here. He loves it,” said his wife, Cicily.

Civil War Profiles: Researching Delaware graves at Arlington National Cemetery

The endless rows of white headstones that spill across the rolling hills of Arlington National Cemetery are a startling reminder of the costliest four years in our country’s military history. One of the main areas for interment of Civil War soldiers is Section 13.

NWTF offers women the opportunity to learn outdoor skills

Women looking to learn about self-defense, shooting, hunting and more can do just that next month, during the Lower Delaware Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation’s (NWTF) second annual Women in the Outdoors event.

Local author releases second novel

Local author Bob Ackerman has just released his second novel, The Doppelganger Project, a riveting “what if” retelling of World War II, which Ackerman describes as “historic science fiction.”

Arts & Jazz Festival set for Saturday at Freeman

The seventh annual Arts & Jazz Festival will hit the Freeman Stage at Bayside in West Fenwick this weekend, showcasing live jazz performances and local artists.

BART returns to Dickens Parlour Theatre for third season

For its third year, the Bethany Area Repertory Theatre (BART) will be gracing the stage at Millville’s Dickens Parlour Theatre.

‘Macbeth’ set to bubble on the beach

Coastal Point • Submitted: Brown Box Theatre Project will be bringing ‘Macbeth’ to the Indian River Life-Saving Station on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 7:30 p.m. Above, the three witches gather ’round the cauldron to cast a spell.Coastal Point • Submitted: Brown Box Theatre Project will be bringing ‘Macbeth’ to the Indian River Life-Saving Station on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 7:30 p.m. Above, the three witches gather ’round the cauldron to cast a spell.“Double, double, toil and trouble” — the witches’ caldron will bubble on the beach at the Indian River Life-Saving Station on Thursday, Sept. 18, at 7:30 p.m., and those who attend can bring a beach chair, blanket, picnic and friends.

For the fourth year, the Brown Box Theatre Project is bringing free outdoor performances of a different Shakespeare play to Delmarva. This year, we are being treated to “Macbeth,” Shakespeare’s spellbinding vision of ambition, treachery, mystery and magic.

Whether one’s last connection with Shakespeare was in high school or you are a devotee of the bard, audiences are consistently delighted by Brown Box’s innovative, enthusiastic, youthful and totally professional treatment of every scene.

The Brown Box Theatre Project was founded in 2009 by Kyler Taustin, who grew up on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and graduated from Emmerson College’s theater directing program. He saw a need for classical and contemporary theater to be equally available for all members of any community, not just the privileged few.

Ice, ice bucket: Wilgus Associates get frosty for a friend

Coastal Point • Laura Walter : Wilgus Associates employees participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, in honor of their friend and co-worker, Tim Hill, the company’s vice president who has been diagnosed with ALS.Coastal Point • Laura Walter : Wilgus Associates employees participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, in honor of their friend and co-worker, Tim Hill, the company’s vice president who has been diagnosed with ALS.There have been many people spilling buckets of ice water on their heads lately. Locally, Wilgus Associates, an insurance, property management, real estate company, recently added another 40 people to the nationwide roster of people who have done the Ice Bucket Challenge for ALS. But Wilgus Associates did it for a loved one: their own Tim Hill, company vice president.

“Some people think it’s kind of a fad on the Internet, but it’s real people who have this debilitating, 100 percent fatal disease,” said Hill.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or “Lou Gehrig’s disease,” is a neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Eventually, the brain is unable to control, or even initiate, movement in the muscles, often leading to paralysis.

Civil War Profiles: The Delaware Military Academy controversy

The state legislature approved the creation of a military school for young men in Wilmington in 1859, but its contribution to education in Delaware was short-lived. It could not survive the increasingly confrontational political atmosphere following the outbreak of hostilities between the states.

Sea glass jewelry classes offered September 21

One of the most popular activities in Delaware Seashore State Park is to comb the undeveloped beaches for seashells and other signs of marine life. Occasionally, park visitors are lucky enough to spot pieces of sea glass that have washed up in the surf.

Film festival sneak peek offered at Oct. 4 event

The Rehoboth Beach Film Society announced this week that this year’s Catch Festival Fever fundraiser will take place at the Fort Miles Battery 519 in Cape Henlopen State Park on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Guild’s Night of Songs & Stories, Sept. 16, to focus on ‘Doors’

On Tuesday, Sept. 16, the Rehoboth Beach Writers’ Guild will host another night of “Songs & Stories” at Annabella’s in Lewes (1201 Savanah Road). The event, which starts at 7 p.m. and lasts until about 8:30, is free and open to the public.

South Bethany opens its own little library

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : South Bethany resident Lori Cicero came up with the idea to put a little library near town hall, and the town’s Community Enhancement Committee agreed to have one installed. Residents and visitors can stop by and take or leave a book at any time.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : South Bethany resident Lori Cicero came up with the idea to put a little library near town hall, and the town’s Community Enhancement Committee agreed to have one installed. Residents and visitors can stop by and take or leave a book at any time.Residents and visitors to South Bethany no longer have to travel to neighboring communities to enjoy the offerings of a library. Last week, the town’s Free Little Library was installed on Evergreen Road, near town hall, welcoming community members to enjoy free books at their leisure.

“This idea was brought to the Community Enhancement Committee by one of our members, Lori Cicero,” said Councilwoman Sue Callaway, who chairs the committee.

Cicero said she had seen similar little libraries over the last few years, and thought the concept would work well for the town.

“I walk my dog at Northside Park and saw it again last year. I thought, you know, this would be a nice thing for the community.”

The concept is, provide a box somewhere in a community, where books may be taken or shared free of charge.

“It’s supposed to be take a book or leave a book… or not. But they’re there to take,” she said. “It’s like a service to the community.”

Cicero brought the idea to the Community Enhancement Committee (CEC), where it was embraced, and fellow committee member Pat Weisgerber volunteered her husband’s woodworking skills for the job.

Herlihy’s revolutionary ‘Buck Board’ turns 10

Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark  : Colin Herlihy and Eric Simons go over some notes after the last Bethany Skim Jam of the summer.Coastal Point • R. Chris Clark : Colin Herlihy and Eric Simons go over some notes after the last Bethany Skim Jam of the summer.Chances are, if you follow board sports, you know who Colin Herlihy is. You’ve seen him in the newspapers and in the magazines. You’ve seen him in surf movies and documentaries and pretty much anything else there is to be seen in.

Chances are you also know that he’s got his own signature bodyboard model from Toobs or you’ve noticed the deer logo on the front of one of those boards under the arm of a grom headed to the beach.

But what you may not know is that, while that deer logo is a symbol, it’s not just a symbol for the Herlihy board, or even Herlihy himself, but a symbol for all of Sussex County. A symbol designed to remind people of an idea that was launched long before its time, and of two kids from the backwoods of Delaware with a passion for riding waves, and a dream.

“Just the other day, I was sitting on the beach in Fenwick, watching these guys skimming and stand-up surfing the Buck Boards, having such a good time, and was thinking about this story and how things like this evolve and how much fun and joy people can have from putting a few ideas in motion,” said Eric Simons, who was instrumental in a long trial-and-error design process that resulted, now more than 10 years ago, in the first Herlihy prototype. “I think it’s pretty cool to be part of something like that.”

A lifelong waterman and friend of Herlihy’s, Simon’s involvement in what would turn out to be a revolutionary endeavor for bodyboards and bodyboarders began long before either of their careers in the surfing industry did.

Before there were Go Pros and Instagram and “Stacking Clips,” before the Bethany jetties were destroyed for beach replenishment, and before Herlihy ever won a contest or charged Hurricane Sandy or even sported a sticker on his board — it all started with the two of them, when they were groms themselves, trying to balance their bodyboards on their bicycle handlebars as they made their way to the beach.

Civil War Profiles: Burton, Cannon & Saulsbury: Delaware’s wartime governors

During the four tumultuous years of the Civil War, 1861-1865, three men held the reins of government in Delaware. It was William Burton’s fate to be in the office of governor when secession was under consideration at the outset of the war. William Cannon won election replacing him to lead a divided state in 1862. And Gove Saulsbury ascended to the governor’s seat upon Cannon’s untimely death as the war ground to a halt.

A Sussex Countian by birth, Burton graduated from Pennsylvania Medical College in 1810 and practiced medicine in Lewes before moving to Milford. A former Whig, he joined the Democratic Party and ascended to the governorship in 1858.

Reed, McKay and Wade point out in “Delaware during the War Between the States” that Burton exhibited mixed views about the North-South divide — mirroring the attitude of many Delawareans. While ostensibly an anti-secessionist, he called for a convention to consider secession from the Union. However, the legislature failed to act on his request.

Burton appointed stalwart Unionist Henry duPont as a major-general of the state militia. When DuPont directed the arms of potential Confederate militia companies within the state be confiscated, however, Burton revoked his order. Despite this, military authorities disarmed Southern-leaning militias in Seaford, Laurel, Georgetown and elsewhere in the state.

Millsboro Country Festival becoming signature event

In just a few weeks, Millsboro’s annual Country Festival will return to the town, bringing with it music, activities, food and more. Organized by the Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce, the festival was designed to be a signature event for the town and its surrounding communities.