Bethany Beach to hold elections on Saturday


Bethany Beach voters will head to the polls this Saturday, Sept. 8, to select candidates to fill three seats on the town council. Regardless of the outcome, at least one new face will be seen behind the council table starting later this month. But which new face or faces, and how many of them, is in the hands of the voters.

With incumbents Lew Killmer and Wayne Fuller not seeking re-election, Mayor Carol Olmstead is the only incumbent among the candidates, running for a third two-year term. Olmstead is the chairwoman of the town’s Cultural and Historical Affairs Committee, which has recently overseen the renovation of the town hall lobby as a town museum facility and which has been organizing second-season cultural events at town hall for the last two years.

While Olmstead is the only current council member running for re-election, the other three candidates for the office are not without experience in the town’s government.

Joseph T. “Joe” Healy is seeking a council seat for the third time, having sought to replace a retiring council member in 2005 and having run for the office in the 2006 elections. He currently serves on the town’s Budget and Finance Committee, where his experience as a certified public accountant has been noted.

J. Robert “Bob” Parsons is a familiar face to those who have attended council meetings in past years. The town’s former mayor and long-time council member has continued serving as the chairman of the Bethany Beach Board of Adjustments even after losing his council seat in the elections of 2005.

Parsons has also served actively on the Intergovernmental Relations Committee, where he has been heavily involved in the issue of beach replenishment, which, after many years of waiting and lobbying for federal funding, is due to begin in the coming weeks.

Margaret Bogan Young has been a driving force behind historical preservation efforts in the town, as both the secretary of the Bethany Beach Historical Association and a member of the Cultural and Historical Affairs Committee. Young has also been heavily involved with the Bethany Beach Women’s Civic Club and, this summer, as a volunteer in the new Bethany Beach Farmers’ Market.

Citizens of Bethany Beach will be able to vote for up to three of the four candidates when polling begins at town hall on Saturday, Sept. 8, at noon. Voting will close at 6 p.m.

Bethany Beach property owners who are listed on the town’s property tax list are not required to register to vote in town elections. Residents of Bethany Beach who do not own property must have registered to vote at least 30 days prior to the election. The last day to register to vote in this year’s election was Aug. 9.

Proof of identity and address is required to vote. The required identification is one or more of the following items: a current State of Delaware driver’s license; a uniformed service ID card; another current photo ID issued by the State of Delaware, U.S. government, the voter’s employer, high school or higher education institution; a current utility bill, bank statement, credit card statement, a paycheck or another type of bill or statement; a lease or sales agreement; and/or any other documentation that a person can reasonably and commonly accept as proof of identity and address.

The Bethany Beach Board of Elections and election officers will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8, in the town hall, to present a list of those who have submitted absentee ballots for the election, and to allow challenges to those ballots. Ballots will be counted after presentation of the list. This is a new, more formal, treatment of absentee ballots, in accordance with new state law on municipal elections.

Also new with this election is the requirement for at least one week to pass between the election and the seating of new council members, which is also required by the new state law. The waiting period is designed to allow challenges to the election results before the winners in the election take office.

The council has therefore set its traditional reorganizational meeting for Monday, Sept. 17, at 10:30 a.m. at the town hall. At the meeting, the council will select from among its number the mayor, vice-mayor and council secretary/treasurer for the coming year.

Voters will get one more chance to hear from all the candidates the night before the election, when the Bethany Beach Landowners Association holds its traditional meet-the-candidates night, on Friday, Sept. 7, at 7 p.m., at the Bethany Beach fire hall.

In the meantime, and for the record, the Coastal Point presents its traditional question-and-answer series with each of the four candidates for the three Bethany Beach Town Council seats for 2007:

Carol Olmstead

Q. Are additional steps needed by the town to control the building of large homes, preserve older homes or control the architecture of residential building within the town? If so, what would your recommendations be?

A. In 2003 the Bethany Beach Planning Commission recommended a change in the town code requiring that the permitted 40 percent lot coverage include any and all structures, including steps, porches, walkways and driveways. This was met with townwide opposition. In response to the many letters, e-mails and phone calls received, Council voted this recommendation down.

In 2005, after much research and input, the Planning Commission recommended to Council an architectural solution in an attempt to maintain the characteristic appearance of homes in Bethany Beach. Council approved this recommendation, which resulted in Bethany Beach’s first referendum opposing the approved ordinance. Again, Council responded to what was perceived to be the voice of the public and reversed their previous vote on the issue.

This is an ongoing issue in Bethany Beach, as in many communities throughout our country. What is not clear is what is actually desired. Giving voice to “no bigger houses,” and yet objecting to any infringement of property owner’s rights or to alternative solutions provides only a sense of ambivalence as to what is actually envisioned.

My recommendation is for the Planning Commission to address this issue once again, and for all interested to attend these meetings as we work together to frame the future of our town.

Q. Should the town move to improve the availability of public parking?

A. The “town” constantly considers issues related to parking in Bethany Beach, weighing the needs of residents, visitors and the business community. The town trolley, operating primarily at town expense, last year carried 30,000 passengers. This has been a major effort on the part of the town to alleviate the parking concerns during the busy summer months. Needless to say, availability of space limits options for additional parking, and not too many have expressed support for a parking garage in our pristine town. Bill Dowdell, our parking supervisor, has remarked that there is adequate parking most of the time, but people have to be willing walk a few extra blocks during the busiest times. Parking is a difficulty in any area that draws large numbers of people. This will remain an issue that will continue to require attempted solutions.

Q. How should the town deal with reduced transfer tax revenues? Should the recent property tax increase be repealed, reduced, continued or expanded?

A. The town has responsibly and effectively dealt with the downturn in transfer tax revenues in planning for the current fiscal year budget. Presented with a substantial shortfall regarding projections that were based upon several previous years of revenue, and upon recommendations from the Budget and Finance committee, the town council voted to approve a balanced budget without sacrificing services or amenities we have been accustomed to in Bethany Beach. When all was said and done, an equitable and fair solution that incurred additional revenues from property owners, visitors and the business community alike made this possible.

Q. What can the town do to reduce the impact of growth outside its limits upon citizens in Bethany Beach?

A. I believe we are all aware of the difficulty of this issue. “Beach” is the attraction that has been motivating development in the areas surrounding Bethany Beach, and attempts to have our Sussex County Council recognize the impact on the beach communities has for the most part not been heeded. Many communities outside of the coastal towns have actually welcomed development as they have sought to annex land and been able to add to their tax base. Continuing to work with our state representatives in an effort to make the state park beaches more available to the public is one of the solutions that I want us to pursue. Beach passes have been suggested, and indeed may have to be reconsidered in the future. However, our town survey, conducted in 2003, indicated that the majority of our Bethany Beach property owners did not favor this move.

Q. Should the town limit non-resident property owners’ votes? In what ways should the town change voting procedures in the future, if any?

A. The large percentage of non-resident property owners in Bethany Beach, as in other coastal towns, was the incentive for providing these voting privileges. The importance of assuring a cohesive community makes this a viable choice today also. As we know, the municipal election laws passed this year by the state legislature, mandate voting procedures for our election. The Town of Bethany Beach has worked assiduously, this year, to follow these and I am sure will continue to do so in the future.

Q. What uses should the town allow and/or pursue for the former Christian Church and Neff properties?

A. Although there is not any definitive plan for the “Church/Neff” properties, it was the expressed desire of the town councils during the procurement procedures that the land be purchased primarily in order to provide an area of “open/green space.” This notion has been supported by many in our town. When the time comes to give serious consideration to making any definitive plans, there should be opportunities for sufficient public input as all reasonable options are put forth previous to decisions being made.

Q. What would you like to see happen with the new Bethany Beach Farmers’ Market? Do you have any recommendations or ideas you feel the council should pursue about the market?

A. The Bethany Beach Farmers Market was a grand success this year, with no small credit to all whose volunteer efforts contributed to make it so. I’m sure I am not alone in expecting it will continue next year, and perhaps include even more weeks if possible. From the time the Delaware Department of Agriculture first approached the town, the market was given full support by the Town Council and the town staff. Feedback from Mrs. Bennett, who coordinated the farmers, expressed her appreciation for the support provided by the town, and felt the chosen location was ideal. It was a great team effort.

Q. Should the town ban smoking on the beach? Why or why not?

A. The issue of banning smoking on the beach has only very recently been introduced, with the code and ordinance committee just last month receiving direction from the Town Council to further study the issue and present its findings. Like most issues that come before Council, there will be the pros and cons to be considered as decisions are made. My four years of experience as a town council member have confirmed my belief that it is best to consider all available information in order to reach an informed decision.

Citizen input has indicated that this is something that many would like to see pursued by the Council in the near future.

Q. What — if any — initiatives or changes would you like to pursue if elected to the council? Also, describe why you feel you should be elected.

A. Over the past four years of serving on the Town Council there have been many initiatives pursued and many decisions made. I ask, over this time has not the community continued to have a better look and feel in many respects? Our long-awaited bandstand has been completed; we have been complemented and awarded for the outstanding horticultural displays throughout the town; the Bethany Beach Nature Center, already available to the public, will soon be completed. All this and we still have the lowest tax rate in the state of Delaware.

There will always be new issues to address as Bethany Beach continues to be attractive to an increasing number of people. Working to maintain the quality of life so important to all of us, while confronting inevitable changes, requires informed and comprehensive decision making. Working toward our beach replenishment funding this past year increased my awareness of the processes involved in accomplishing goals for our town. I would like to continue serving the people of Bethany Beach and I believe that my past experience contributes greatly to my being a good choice for Town Council this year.

J. Robert Parsons

Q. Are additional steps needed by the town to control the building of large homes, preserve older homes or control the architecture of residential building within the town? If so, what would your recommendations be?

A. The town already has a rule in place to control the building of large homes. The rule, made some years ago, states that a home’s footprint can cover only 40 percent of a lot. As lot prices rose, the homes that were built increased in size; some of the more recently built homes approach that maximum size. At the same time, strict enforcement of our setback rules has made it economically prohibitive to rehabilitate older homes.

I would like Town Council to explore ways to make rehabilitating older homes a viable alternative to razing them and building completely new structures. While I have no specific suggestions at this time, I am researching the steps that other towns have taken to preserve their older buildings.

Q. Should the town move to improve the availability of public parking?

A. Given the size of the town, and particularly the size of the area where there is a high demand for parking space, the town has already made about as much parking space available as the area will accommodate. Here are the numbers: We have 997 metered parking spaces, and 890 permit spaces. Of those spaces, 662 are east of Route 1.

This year, 2,664 property owners applied for their free parking permit. Of those, 1,718 applied and paid for a second permit, and of those people, 688 applied and paid for a third permit. Thus we have over 5,000 permitted vehicles competing for fewer than 900 permit spaces. To alleviate some of the competition for “up front” spaces, the town now spends about $60,000 a year to operate two trolleys to bring people from throughout the town to the beach, the boardwalk or any other place in town.

The proportion of occupied parking spaces determines the quality of experience our citizens and visitors have on the beach and in the bandstand and downtown commercial area. More parking will crowd our beach further during the day, and jam our entertainment and shopping areas until they become gridlocked with people. Those conditions move us further away from our character as a “small, family-oriented beach town.” We need to resist anything that moves us away from that character.

Q. How should the town deal with reduced transfer tax revenues? Should the recent property tax increase be repealed, reduced, continued or expanded?

A. Transfer taxes, which are a percentage of real estate sales within our corporate limits, are an unreliable source of income. Therefore they should be used only for planned capital expenses, planned debt retirement, or for early debt retirement when that is financially beneficial to us. Because the amount we will receive in a year is unpredictable during the creation of the budget, those monies should never be used for operational expenses.

If we are to continue to receive the services we receive at their current level, then the recent property tax increase should be sustained. Indeed, increases in other sources of income over the years have made it possible to avoid an increase for the last 15 years. And barring some catastrophic event, those sources will continue to supplement property tax receipts so that relative to other communities, our property taxes will remain low. A property assessed at $625,000 pays $1,000 in taxes at the current rate; compare that to other communities in Delaware, or in the region.

Perhaps we should view the largess of transfer tax revenue in previous years as having prevented property tax increases, rather than viewing this year’s reduced revenue as having caused the property tax increase.

Q. What can the town do to reduce the impact of growth outside its limits upon citizens in Bethany Beach?

A. The growth outside of town has placed us on the horns of a dilemma. If we continue to make the town pretty, offer evening entertainment and fireworks, and have our two parades, more people will come from outside the town limits to enjoy those features, and to enjoy the beach. They bring revenue to us in the form of parking fees, but each additional person adds to what some perceive as overcrowding.

We can raise those fees, and cut back on the events to reduce the crowding, and at some point the crowds will decline – and so will total revenue. And despite the fact that we have a public beach, we can explore ways to limit access so that people on the beach feel uncrowded.

There are other things that can be done to reduce the impact on Bethany. One would be to negotiate with other local governments that approve the growth. Another would be to ask State government to make more beaches available to the public, to provide bus service along Route 26, to prohibit development that is unsupported with infrastructure – and the list could go on and on. If those other governments are completely unresponsive to us, then I hope that our citizens – the residents and the non-residents — will work to change the composition of those governments. The very nature of our town allows us to have influence beyond our town’s borders, and we must flex that muscle if the character of Bethany is to remain.

Q. Should the town limit non-resident property owners’ votes? In what ways should the town change voting procedures in the future, if any?

A. The town should continue to permit non-resident property owners to vote, and to hold positions on Town Council, committees, commissions and boards. Non-residents have made valuable contributions to town operations in the past, and I anticipate that they will in the future.

Our voting procedures are new this year, dictated by the State. Until we find out how they work, I have no recommendations for change.

Q. What uses should the town allow and/or pursue for the former Christian Church and Neff properties?

A. There are several possible uses, one of which may become a near-term need. If the Christian Church expands their activities on their current property, we will need a place for at least some of the recreation facilities that are there now. The trees provide sufficient shade to reduce the threat of sunburn. The trolley runs west on Central Avenue, eliminating the need to cross Route 1 as a pedestrian from the east side. The location west of Route 1 makes the facilities more safely available to those families who are on the west side of Route 1. Another possibility is to create a small dog park.

Both uses fit the criteria that I have for use of that land. They are: (a) provide benefit to the whole town, and (b) minimize any disruption to the neighborhood surrounding the area.

Q. What would you like to see happen with the new Bethany Beach Farmers’ Market? Do you have any recommendations or ideas you feel the council should pursue about the market?

A. The town should not be in the business of subsidizing the market. I have no recommendations for the market at present. The market exists as a convenience to those who prefer to shop there rather than in our local stores.

Q. Should the town ban smoking on the beach? Why or why not?

A. I will support whatever restrictions on smoking on the beach that will minimize, if not eliminate, the problems that result from smoking on the beach.

Q. What — if any — initiatives or changes would you like to pursue if elected to the council? Also, describe why you feel you should be elected.

I will pursue the adherence to the process that our ordinances require for adoption of policy. I will pursue removing disincentives for restoring older houses. And I will vigorously oppose changes that reduce the opportunity for non-residents to vote, or to participate in our government.

I should be supported and elected because of my broad range of experience in our government. The Town Councils on which I served re-wrote the charter, stimulated the State to do the first beach renourishment since 1962, built the new water plant, and rebuilt the boardwalk twice. We purchased the largest undeveloped parcel of land remaining in the town, made significant improvements to drainage, and worked very hard to bring both planning money and the initial phase of construction money to our beach reconstruction project.

Attending and working in the schools at both ends of the state has made possible the creation of relationships with legislators and others in the state that no candidate or currently serving council member has. I have used those relationships to the town’s advantage in the past, and will do so again as your elected Town Councilperson.

Joseph T. Healy Jr.

Q. Are additional steps needed by the town to control the building of large homes, preserve older homes or control the architecture of residential building within the town? If so, what would your recommendations be?

A. The town has a very competent and active planning committee, which addresses issues regarding residential building. I would listen to their recommendations and satisfy myself regarding the clarity and completeness of the explanation, including I would expect both the pros and cons related to the issue.

Q. Should the town move to improve the availability of public parking?

A. There is no question that the town has an issue with not only the availability of parking, but traffic and pedestrian safety. There is not a simple answer to this question, but this has to be addressed in a comprehensive manner. I have formulated some ideas regarding this question and they really are related to long-term comprehensive planning. A Band-aid solution, considering what is going on to the west of town, is not the answer.

Q. How should the town deal with reduced transfer tax revenues? Should the recent property tax increase be repealed, reduced, continued or expanded?

A. The town has dealt with its reliance on variable sources of revenue for our fiscal year 2007-2008. The Budget and Finance Committee, in its deliberations, attempted to project over the next five years our financial needs, and based on the facts and circumstances as are known today, this objective was addressed.

It is important that it is clearly understood unequivocally that our town’s finances are in very excellent condition. The challenge that we face on a long-term basis is the effect of the changing Sussex County demographic and its apparent lack of infrastructure planning.

Q. What can the town do to reduce the impact of growth outside its limits upon citizens in Bethany Beach?

A. The impact of growth in Sussex County, as was stated above, is an issue of long-term planning. I believe we must attempt through coalescence with the other coastal communities, as well as the inland communities that are impacted. It is also clear to me that we should try to address within our environs, what we need to do to prepare for these demographic changes.

As an aside, recently I drove up Route 26 and turned onto Route 17, a two-lane county road, toward Selbyville. I noted along this drive a number of signs announcing the new community “Millville by the Sea.” I searched valiantly for the “Sea” during this journey, but alas to no avail. Could it be that the “Sea” is located at Bethany Beach?

Q. Should the town limit non-resident property owners’ votes? In what ways should the town change voting procedures in the future, if any?

A. The voting rights of our non-resident property owners have, in my mind, had the positive effect to make us all stakeholders in our town. Isn’t it too bad that these non-resident property owners don’t have a vote in Sussex County?

Q. What uses should the town allow and/or pursue for the former Christian Church and Neff properties?

A. The utilization by the town of the “Christian Church and Neff Properties” should be, as I understand, in concert with the stipulated uses as defined by the town council at the time of the transfers. I would like to see the town council call upon the planning committee at the appropriate time for their advice and consent, as a matter of due process.

Q. What would you like to see happen with the new Bethany Beach Farmers’ Market? Do you have any recommendations or ideas you feel the council should pursue about the market?

A. My understanding of the Bethany Beach Farmers’ Market is that during this initial year of operation, it has been a success beyond the town’s and farmers expectations. The early sell-out of produce this year might indicate the need for a potential relocation with more space in future summers. Certainly, this has been a win-win for everyone.

Q. Should the town ban smoking on the beach? Why or why not?

A. The potential ban of smoking on the beach is presently under committee review. It seems that other beach communities also have this ban under consideration. The committee, upon its presentations of the pros and cons of a smoking ban, must, if they are recommending in favor, address clearly the enforcement issue, as this seems to be the most difficult part of such a solution. The committees recommendations are again part of the town’s due and deliberate process.

Q. What — if any — initiatives or changes would you like to pursue if elected to the council? Also, describe why you feel you should be elected.

A. I would like to see the town council, during this term, to clearly focus on some of the long-term substantive issues that we face: The 200,000 ton demographic and infrastructure gorilla that is poised on our doorstep, as thrust upon us by the county. Long-term capital improvement projects, i.e., water tower, storm water management, and the Natter property to name a few. I believe addressing long-term planning issues is essential in order for us to maintain our town’s culture as the “Quiet Resort.” The history of our town can be broken down into 50-year cycles, and we have now just entered the third such period, which presents its own set of challenges.

I believe my election to council would be a positive for our town. I bring to the table a skill set, financial background, that can augment in a positive fashion the town’s current as well as long-term goals and objectives. I am a CPA that has had a very successful and satisfying professional career. I have, in addition, during my career, been committed to active community, professional and public service. During the past year, I have been a highly involved, as well as positive member of the town’s Budget and Finance Committee. I like my actions to speak for themselves, so ask any member of the committee, as well as attendees at our meetings, of my preparation and focus.

My wife Peggie, a retired R.N., and I have been coming here with our family for the last 30-35 years, and have been property owners since 1988. We are now in the process of, hopefully, making this our full-time residence.

Peggie and I are committed to our town, and I look forward to your consideration for my candidacy, as I will try to do the best job I can in this position of trust and responsibility.

Now, as I have asked, in order for me to know your position on my candidacy:

“May all those in favor find their road to Heaven paved with gold.”

“May all those against, twist their ankle so that we may know them by their limp.”

Being of a benevolent nature, I wish no one a twisted ankle. Your time, attention and consideration are appreciated.

Margaret Bogan Young

Q. Are additional steps needed by the town to control the building of large homes, preserve older homes or control the architecture of residential building within the town? If so, what would your recommendations be?

A. Recent years have seen the demolition of many of the older homes which were, and are, so much a part of Bethany’s history. Incentives to preserve their homes should be offered to the owners in order to halt this trend. Once these architectural treasures are gone, they are gone forever. They are lost forever, along with their family stories. The updating and completion of the University of Delaware survey of the town’s historic structures and the formation of a Bethany Beach Historic Preservation program would greatly aid this endeavor. The building code needs to be revised in order to control the size and number of the huge homes (mini-motels), which are adversely impacting the traditional family atmosphere of Bethany. They are in direct opposition to the wishes of the majority of property owners, as expressed in the 2004 Citizens Participation Project Questionnaire.

Q. Should the town move to improve the availability of public parking?

A. Public parking in Bethany does not need to be expanded. However, additional permit parking areas would be very desirable and highly beneficial to Bethany homeowners, their guests and tenants. Expansion of the very successful trolley system should be investigated.

Q. How should the town deal with reduced transfer tax revenues? Should the recent property tax increase be repealed, reduced, continued or expanded?

A. At this time, the property tax increase should not be reduced or repealed, as apparently the income is needed. However, a clear definition of what comprises our “needs” and “wants” is imperative. Town expenditures should be sensibly controlled, thoroughly justified and explained to the public. If there had been more foresight in spending plans involving a fluctuating income, such as the transfer tax, doubling the property tax may not have been necessary.

Q. What can the town do to reduce the impact of growth outside its limits upon citizens in Bethany Beach?

A. The greatest impact of the uncontrolled area development is felt by the residents of Bethany Beach. We experience this in the overcrowding of our streets, boardwalk and beach. The need for greater police and lifeguard protection, more water use, trash collections and comfort facilities place a drain on our financial resources. Furthermore, the occurrence of a major storm at the season’s height could prove disastrous, since Route 26 is the only evacuation route in our immediate area before it intersects with Route 17 at Clarksville. U.S. Route 1 cannot be utilized as it will be flooded by the ocean. Therefore, the town should take the lead among our coastal and regional neighbors in formulating a plan to force the county and state to require developers to provide adequate public infrastructure before issuing building permits.

Q. Should the town limit non-resident property owners’ votes? In what ways should the town change voting procedures in the future, if any?

A. Non-resident property owners pay exactly the same taxes and fees as permanent residents, while making substantially fewer demands on the public services. More effort needs to be expended in the communication of town decisions and happenings, along with encouraging non-residents to share their varied talents by becoming involved in town affairs. Publicizing walk-in absentee voting might be a good place to start.

Q. What uses should the town allow and/or pursue for the former Christian Church and Neff properties?

A. The former Christian Church/Neff property comprises 5.8682 acres. The contract for the Neff section, purchased in 2004, stipulates that there be installed a memorial plaque, with landscaping, honoring the residents of the town and its environs who have served in the U.S. military on active duty outside the continental U.S. The town’s “environs” include the area bounded by Indian River, Routes 54 and 113, and the Atlantic Ocean. This project should be undertaken without further delay. The remaining land would provide an ideal site for a permanent Bethany Beach Museum, as the present location of the museum in the lobby of the town hall is inadequate for the display of the Historical Association’s additional artifacts and pictures. Perhaps one of Bethany’s historic homes, threatened with demolition, could be donated or otherwise acquired, moved to the property and renovated to become the town’s permanent museum.
Q. What would you like to see happen with the new Bethany Beach Farmers’ Market? Do you have any recommendations or ideas you feel the council should pursue about the market?

The Farmers’ Market has certainly been a great success and an asset to the community due to the efforts of the town, the Bethany Beach Landowners Association and the Women’s Civic Club. As the only Farmers’ Market volunteer running for council, I was proud to be a part of this undertaking. There have been several requests for the market to be extended through Labor Day weekend next year. I will continue to be an enthusiastic and conscientious supporter of the Farmers’ Market.

Q. Should the town ban smoking on the beach? Why or why not?

A. Neither I nor my children have ever smoked. Obviously, if smoking is banned on the beach, it must also be prohibited on the boardwalk and bandstand areas. There are many questions associated with this issue, such as how it will be policed, by whom, during what hours of the day and night, the cost involved and the penalties for violations. While undoubtedly an admirable goal, this may be a project that is “more trouble than it’s worth.”

Q. What — if any — initiatives or changes would you like to pursue if elected to the council? Also, describe why you feel you should be elected.

A. I have discussed the initiatives I would like to pursue in my responses to questions 1 through 6. These may be summed up as preserving Bethany’s history and maintaining the quiet, family-oriented atmosphere of the town. I love Bethany Beach. It has been my summer and now permanent home for my entire life. We have been property owners for over 60 years. My parents were involved in the formation of the BBLA and the building of St. Ann’s Church. During my school years, I worked summers in Bethany Beach’s businesses, as my children did later. Friendships formed here have lasted 50 and 60 years. Since becoming a permanent resident, I have participated in many volunteer organizations, benefiting Bethany and the surrounding area. I know and care about the people, will always be available to listen to their concerns and do my very best to assist them.