New community healthy to wallet, planet


The national real estate market is in tough shape. The local market has been touched, too, though there are signs of improvement. And anyone who follows the news understands that the world in general is paying quite a bit more attention to the environment these days.

Coastal Point • Ted Mathias: Selbyville Councilmen Clarence ‘Bud’ Tingle Jr. and G. Frank Smith, along with Debbie Hudson, right, look over a site plan for the new development of Lighthouse Crossing during an open house at the development in Selbyville on Thursday, June 26.Coastal Point • Ted Mathias
Selbyville Councilmen Clarence ‘Bud’ Tingle Jr. and G. Frank Smith, along with Debbie Hudson, right, look over a site plan for the new development of Lighthouse Crossing during an open house at the development in Selbyville on Thursday, June 26.

With all that being said, Lighthouse Crossing appears to be a community of its time.

The Selbyville development, which will feature three phases of construction that will result in about 130 homes being built, addresses these issues and more.

“The current market has allowed us to buy land at a decent rate and build and sell houses in the high $200,000 to low $300,000 range,” explained Michael Crosby, the managing partner of Lighthouse Crossing, and the president of Crosby New Home Sales & Marketing, the company handling the sales of Lighthouse Crossing. “And, with the influx of retires moving to Slower Lower, we’re able to reach that group of people who are looking for a nice home at a decent price.”

So, it’s a retirement community, right?

“No, this isn’t age-restricted,” said Crosby. “But it is somewhat age-targeted. We know that retirees don’t want to spend a lot of money on a home, and they really don’t want big bills every month. But we’re also attractive to young couples and families.”

The homes at Lighthouse Crossing have “single-floor” living, according to Crosby. For those who don’t want to have to go upstairs to go to bed, these houses feature master bedrooms on the main floor, along with living areas and the kitchen. The homes in Lighthouse Crossing also will utilize geothermal HVAC systems.

“Good for the environment, and even better for the wallet,” said Crosby. “Our typical prospective buyer will be at or near a stage of life where they will be making very careful calculations of their monthly cost of ownership. At the same time, they are a generation that came of age at the height of the environmental movement. Our homes will appeal both to fiscal and environmental concerns.”

Geothermal HVAC systems tap into the earth itself to heat and cool a home, at a better cost to the consumer than typical systems.

Bob Klienpaste, a partner in Lighthouse Crossing, said that geothermal systems save consumers between 60 and 70 percent of conventional systems.

“When it comes to heating and cooling their homes, Lighthouse Crossing residents will be mostly immune from wild swings in global energy prices,” said Klienpaste. “That’s a nice feeling when your monthly income is finite.”

Besides the first-floor living and geothermal benefits to the homes at Lighthouse Crossing, Crosby also mentioned that the homes will be filled with terrific indoor and outdoor living space. Buyers will have options available to them that include significant upgrades outdoors, including outdoor kitchens, as well as a plethora of options within the home.

Wilgus Associates will handle the property management end of the community, which will include four ponds, walking areas and a multitude of trees. Crosby said that community fees will be about $675 a year for homeowners.

Lighthouse Crossing is located just east of Polly Branch Road on Route 54. For more information on the community, call (410) 819-3311.