Local Lions help Dagsboro plant more than a dozen trees


The Town of Dagsboro was recently the recipient of some needed man-hours, thanks to the Lord Baltimore Lions Club. Members of the club, as well as Kyle Hoyd, the Urban Forestry Coordinator for the state of Delaware, and E.J. Chalabala and Eric Buehl from the Center for the Inland Bays, planted 10 Tonto crape myrtles along Main Street and six eastern red cedars in the park.

Coastal Point •  Monica Scott: Local Lions Club members recently helped plant 16 new trees in Dagsboro. Pictured, from left are: Ken Chew, District Gov. of Delaware Lions Clubs; E.J. Chalabala of the Center for the Inland Bays; Kyle Hoyd, urban forestry coordinator for the State of Delaware; Doug Parham of the Lord Baltimore Lions Club; Eric Buehl of the Center for the Inland Bays; and Rebecca Stancliff, president of the Lord Baltimore Lions ClubCoastal Point • Monica Scott
Local Lions Club members recently helped plant 16 new trees in Dagsboro. Pictured, from left are: Ken Chew, District Gov. of Delaware Lions Clubs; E.J. Chalabala of the Center for the Inland Bays; Kyle Hoyd, urban forestry coordinator for the State of Delaware; Doug Parham of the Lord Baltimore Lions Club; Eric Buehl of the Center for the Inland Bays; and Rebecca Stancliff, president of the Lord Baltimore Lions Club

The trees were purchased with an Urban Forestry grant.

Doug Parham, member of the Lions Club, explained that their international president, Wing-Kun Tam, from Hong Kong, China, had challenged the Lions Clubs worldwide to plant 5 million trees. District Gov. Ken Chew of the Delaware Lions Clubs, of which there are 35, explained that people have stepped up to the plate, and millions have been planted or pledged already.

Parham, a member of the CIB’s Citizens Action Committee, contacted Chalabala, who pointed him to Hoyd. Hoyd then referred him to Stacey Long, the town administrator in Dagsboro. Long applied for the Urban Forestry grant, and the project was born.

The grants require municipalities to provide matching funds, which can also be made in-kind, such as through Town-sponsored labor or materials. With the donation of up to 100 man-hours from the Lions Club and the town contributing $800, the project got off the ground the weekend of Oct. 22.