Citizen reports lead to arrests in Selbyville


Selbyville police arrested four people on Monday, April 9, in two drug-related incidents.

About 9 p.m., police officers responded to the report of suspicious people sitting in a vehicle parked near the Mason Dixon Shopping Center on Route 113. On arrival, officers located Lindsay N. Weaver, 22, and Sean Higgins, 25, both of Ocean City, Md. A subsequent search revealed syringes on the floor of the vehicle, along with other drug paraphernalia.

Weaver was charged with possession of a controlled substance (heroin) and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. Higgins was charged with two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia.

Around 10:30 p.m., officers responded to second report of a suspicious vehicle in a parking lot on southbound Route 113, near Church Street.

Officers located Lindsay M. Lopez, 22, of Berlin, Md., and Tara Staggers, 34, of Ocean City, Md. Officers said they observed on the driver seat several small plastic baggies containing white powder, and a search of the two suspects revealed additional baggies and syringes.

Lopez was charged with possession of a controlled substance (heroin), tampering with evidence and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. Staggers was charged with two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia.

All four of the subjects were released on bond pending a court appearance.

Several of the subjects were allegedly using the heroin when police arrived, Selbyville Police Chief W. Scott Collins told the Coastal Point. In one car, a person was allegedly injecting when police arrived. In another car, a person appeared to be setting down a recently used needle, he said.

Collins said police have seen an increase in heroin in Selbyville, although it is not as common as prescription medication abuse. It appeared, he said, that a dealer had recently delivered heroin to Selbyville, leading to the back-to-back incidents.

The arrests were made due to people alerting the police of suspicious activity, he emphasized.

“We thank the community, when they see suspicious activity, to call and report it,” Collins said. “It helps when you actually see it. Don’t wait to call.”