Lyons receives second Teacher of the Year nod at Carver


Teaching math to sixth- through twelfth-graders isn’t everybody’s dream, but Page Lyons couldn’t imagine doing anything else.

Coastal Point • Monica Scott: Page Lyons was recognized as George Washington Carver School’s Teacher of the Year for the second time in three years.Coastal Point • Monica Scott
Page Lyons was recognized as George Washington Carver School’s Teacher of the Year for the second time in three years.

“I love it. I love my kids,” she said. “It’s challenging, but I love it. I walk into the building every day wanting to walk into the building.”

Lyons was selected as the George Washington Carver School’s Teacher of the Year for the second time in three years this year – something she called a “wonderful honor.”

Lyons grew up in Baltimore, Md., but spent her summers near Bethany Beach. With a mother and grandmother who were teachers and her father teaching for a bit while she was a child, too, she said she always knew it was what she wanted to do. She joked that she had more classroom supplies at age 5 than any supply store did.

“I never thought of doing anything else,” she added.

She attended the University of Delaware and graduated with a degree in elementary and middle school education. She is highly qualified in mathematics and is also special education-certified. She taught for a year in the Capital School District in Dover and also in Baltimore County for almost two years.

At G.W. Carver, she started as their reading specialist, but Lyons has been teaching math for four years. The atmosphere at the school allows for students with special education and or behavioral challenges to learn in a small group setting with individualized training.

Lyons said she sees students all day, in blocks of an hour and a half, so the teachers really have ample time to work with the curriculum. In addition, the students have a computer component that fits in with what they are learning, all the way from addition and subtraction to algebra and geometry and beyond. Just because the students have special learning needs, Lyons explained, doesn’t mean they are not challenged academically just as they would be at any school.

“They are learning what they would be learning anywhere else. It just can be more individualized,” she emphasized.

Lyons added that, while pre-teens and teenagers have a reputation for sometimes being a bigger challenge to work with, she “loves working with the older kids.”

“They can be really insightful,” she said. “You can have a true conversation with them and can have such an impact at this stage. Some of them ask about what they should do after graduation, and some of my kids are the first in their family to graduate high school. It’s amazing to be able to be a part of that.”

Editor’s Note: Lyons is the daughter-in-law of our publisher, Susan Lyons. We tried our best to remain objective with this story, but we’re also very proud of her, and love kissing up to the publisher.