Postal workers welcome IR class prez


Indian River High School’s senior class president Deniz Nhan took the helm at the Frankford Post Office on April 21 (for the day).
Coastal Point • SAM HARVEY: Postmasters Deniz Nhan and Tammy Cohee performing the swearing-in ceremony at the Frankford Post Office on Thursday, April 21.Coastal Point • SAM HARVEY:
Postmasters Deniz Nhan and Tammy Cohee performing the swearing-in ceremony at the Frankford Post Office on Thursday, April 21.

Postmaster Tammy Cohee conducted a solemn swearing-in and welcomed her temporary replacement aboard, quickly setting her to tasks associated with the job.

Back in school the next day, Nhan said things had gone well. “It was a good experience,” she said. “It’s hard work, but everyone there was really nice.”

It’s a job that requires organization, quick hands and stamina (a lot of standing involved with the mail sorting), but she said it seemed a pleasant and friendly workplace.

“They play the radio, talk to one another and there’s a lot of laughing,” Nhan pointed out.

She stuffed post office boxes from her pre-sorted crate, adding “marriage mail” (post office lingo for separate mailers that go into each box together) and weeding out the misdirected letters.

Cohee credited her Postmaster for the day with a job well done. “She was very polite to the customers, and I think she gained a better understanding of how important it is that everyone addresses their mail properly,” Cohee said.

Nhan said it was no problem — it was a quiet day at the post office, and she only came across a few items that didn’t belong in her crate. She said she’d just asked the nearest rural carrier for advice, and they’d been able to sort it out.

However, it did slow down the process, she said. According to Nhan, other people’s mail sometimes wound up in her mailbox at home due to addressing mix-ups.

Different mailboxes on the various routes, and boxes at the post office, often all have the same number, and sometimes the mail comes in without any additional information, Cohee pointed out. Or, people specify a rural route, but then write “P.O. Box,” too — that’s a no-no.

Cohee reminded everyone to address their mail as “R.R. (number), Box (number)” for rural delivery, or “P.O. Box (number)” for pickup at the Frankford Post Office.

“Of course, we’re working in a small town, so here, the carriers mostly know everybody on their routes,” she added.